A Kiwi Christmas and Through your Eyes

Students from local schools have worked together to create small canvases that depict their thoughts of what a Kiwi Christmas is all about.

Along with students from Kaiapoi Borough School , who have created a photographic exhibition entitled “Through their Eyes” because everyone else is taken.

These two exhibitions show the wonderful local talent we have here locally…

I personally loved to see the angles and subject matter in the photo collage

Thank you to the Kaiapoi Club for sponsoring this exhibition… artworks are for SALE

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Five Brothers Grimm Fairytales interpreted by Gaby Reade

Are you sitting comfortably? Then let me begin…

These beautiful images by Gaby Reade will amaze you… not only the artwork but the embossed paper that each image is on is quite beautiful, an artwork in itself.

IMG_3278Gaby has prepared a video presentation of how she creates the artworks and will be in the library reading the stories, so watch for times when she is doing that.

Each artwork is from a series of 20, orders can be placed for framed or unframed.

This exhibition and reading the wonderful fairytales are a must see exhibition at Art on the Quay

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Klimt Decomposed – Kaiapoi Creative Arts Group

A wonderful new exhibition opened tonight at Art on the Quay, Klimt Decomposed by the Kaiapoi Creative Arts Group.

Jackie Watson the Manager of the gallery welcomed the talented local artists, Christine Watton the groups exhibition coordinator gave an overview of how the exhibition came about and how students from both Kaiapoi Borough School and Kaiapoi North Schools were involved in creating some of the wonderfully colourful works of art. This is a must see exhibition…

The following photos are a small glimpse of some of the artworks and the opening night. IMG_6499 IMG_6498 IMG_6497 IMG_6494 IMG_6490 IMG_6488 IMG_6487 DSC_3369 DSC_3370 DSC_3372 DSC_3342 DSC_3375 DSC_3344 DSC_3348 DSC_3380 DSC_3390 DSC_3351 DSC_3354 DSC_3397 DSC_3404 DSC_3364 DSC_3366 DSC_3409

 

 

 

 

The Art of Recovery ( art of Christchurch post quake) a Film Festival movie

The Art of Recovery ( art of Christchurch post quake) a Film Festival movie that is showing at Rangiora tonight 3rd September night with a Q and A session by the film maker Peter Young. .

Pete’s doing a Q&A after the screening in Rangiora on Thursday at 8.05pm. this is a link to The Town Hall Cinemas web page where they can see other session times.

http://www.townhallcinemas.co.nz/Movie+the_art_of_recovery

The Art of Recovery Ex

from chaos comes creativity

When a series of massive earthquakes shakes Christchurch to its foundations, amid the ruins and continuing aftershocks a vibrant community-led movement emerges, empowering the people and creating a promising future for a dynamic new city.
Several years later, amongst the flattened rubble, Central Government and big business have arrived. Their corporate driven, precinct based, urban plan is being imposed on the people and the foundations are going down. In the next year a new Christchurch will arise but whose city will it be and will the creative energy that brought this barren wasteland back to life be a part of its future?
From Christchurch’s own Award Winning Director Peter Young, THE ART OF RECOVERY documents one of the most dynamic, creative and contentious times in the history of Christchurch, a city brought to its knees and now at a crucial crossroad as it transitions from post-quake ruins to recovery.  
Response from the ground:
“Beautiful… Powerful … Compelling… A genuine story of hope.
Peter Young does an outstanding job of capturing the small but significant signs of hope and happiness” – 5 STARS – Chris Lynch – NewstalkZB
 
“Just pure joy to watch…5 STARS!” – Vicki Buck
 
“A really beautiful film, well told, well crafted” – Michelle Bradford
 
“Lets hope the men in suits who planned the city in 100 days make room for creativity and community and the art that comes with it” – Kate White
 
“Another great piece of filming pete well done” – Alwyn Clarke
 
“Made me feel like I live in a very special place….  moving and inspiring” – Emma Johnson 
 
“The power of many small things, eh? People, please see this film” – Coralie Winn

Treasures of the Waimakariri by Kate Jacob

Art On The Quay’s latest exhibition Treasures of the Waimakariri by Kate Jacob will delight the viewer with the delicately detailed drawings of local birds and plants.
Using oil based pencils, Kate reveals the natural beauty  that we see around us. As the illustrator of the Tuhaitara Coastal Park’s recently published Field Guide, (in fact some of the drawings on sale at the gallery can be found in the guide) Kate uses her highly honed drawing skill to faithfully reproduce every feather, foot, bud or branch depicted in her exquisite pictures.
Opening night saw five of her masterpieces red dotted and sold. Buyers have four weeks to view the exhibition which closes on the 16th September.
Pukeko, wrybill, paradise ducks, and fantail are some of the birds chosen as subjects and they are accompanied with plants such as akeake and harakeke.IMG_6091

About the Artist.

Born in England in 1972 Kate Jacob moved to New Zealand with her husband and two children eight years ago.  She studied History and Art at Roehampton Institute of Higher Education in London and gained a Bachelor of Arts degree.  Her first job was arranging other people’s exhibitions in an Arts Centre.  After starting a family, she took up painting portraits of houses and village scenes and selling them at craft fairs.

After moving to New Zealand Kate did a course in Botanical drawing in Rangiora and was introduced to the Oil pencils she now uses.  A relationship with Tuhaitara Coastal Park led to the creation of the field guide which led to this exhibition.

About the medium.

Kate uses Faber Castel Polychromos pencils to produce her work.  The oil based pigments mean the colours are not only rich but are blendable and give one the opportunity to produce iridescent effects.  Incredibly sharp points allow for minute details to be rendered.  Smooth paper means the grain does not interfere with the image so almost photographic effects can be created.

All works are original.

Kaiapoi leading arts boom in North Canterbury

Attracting 24,000 visitors through its doors in its first month, Art on the Quay is Kaiapoi’s new public art gallery. It opened in January this year and is housed within the town’s new library in the Ruataniwha Kaiapoi Civic Centre in Williams Street. In August, the library and gallery will be complemented by the Kaiapoi Museum, reopening in the same complex.

Art on the Quay is one of two galleries supported by the Waimakariri District Council. The Chamber Gallery in Rangiora opened in 1997 and has served as the model for the co-location of Art on the Quay with the library.

Deputy Chairperson for the Waimakariri Community Arts Council, Jackie Watson, has been involved with the establishment of both galleries, as well as promoting the arts in North Canterbury for more than 25 years.

Watson notes, with some pleasure, that taking the proposal for Art on the Quay to the Waimakariri councillors and securing their support was a straightforward task.

“The Chamber Gallery in Rangiora was already a successful model, receiving increasing support from library visitors who initially may have not been enthused. It has built audiences for the visual arts in Rangiora, so it represented a positive relationship and outcome for the Council. It was easy to gain their support by transferring this model to Kaiapoi. The Council also offered to consult with myself and the Arts Council, seeking advice on equipment and the gallery design. Consultation has taken place throughout the project, right up to the opening.”

Watson’s appreciation of a district council actively supportive of the arts is rare. Too often, there seems to be a divide between arts enthusiasts and rate payers. Look no further than the debate over Whangarei residents’ objections to the Hundertwasser Art Centre or the questions often raised in New Plymouth about the relevance of the Govett Brewster Art Gallery’s contemporary programme to the lives of the locals.

Yet, it is not just the good communication between the Waimakariri Council and the Arts Council that singles Art on the Quay out. Watson’s management of the gallery is centred on actively fostering public engagement.

“Exhibitions aim to encourage as much interaction with the public as possible,” she says. “Earlier this year, a group exhibition of favourite artworks in local residents’ collections, featuring artworks by Bill Hammond and Nigel Brown, also gave the public a chance to vote for their favourite paintings. Thousands took the opportunity to cast their vote.”

The current exhibition, Art Expo Revisited, is similarly strong in its emphasis upon the community, paying tribute to the new gallery’s origins.

“Ten years ago, Elaine Armstrong, a local artist, wanted a public gallery in Kaiapoi. Although the idea did not gain traction, it was agreed that an exhibition for local artists would be organised. Out of that came the Art Expo in 2005. Interest in the inaugural event came from more than 100 artists throughout the Waimakariri. We discovered how many artists were out there in North Canterbury and every year since, the Expo receives an average of 30% new submissions from artists who have not previously exhibited with us.”

Guest artists from the past 10 years have been invited to Art Expo Revisited. Highlights include Mary Kelleher, a Northland textile artist and former Christchurch resident whose wall-relief, The Mill is Kaiapoi, traces the town’s history.

“Kelleher starts with the pre-European history, the Woollen Mills as a centre for the town’s industries, and the earthquakes of September 2010. It concludes with the new Civic Centre.”

The Mill is Kaiapoi is also interactive – textile doors and windows can be opened to reveal objects and lenses offering views of photographs and newspaper clippings.

Another guest artist, Mark Lander, exhibits two hand-made paper works, Wreath for the Transitional Cathedral and the impressive, Flowerscape. Both confirm that over the past 30 years Lander has fine-tuned his ability to, not only reveal the beauty of the natural world, but also his reputation as one of New Zealand’s best-kept secrets as a contemporary painter.

The opening of the Kaiapoi Museum on August 15 will further strengthen the Civic Centre’s partners’ relationship and provide an important element of renewal for Kaiapoi. The original Museum housed in the Kaiapoi Historic Court House was demolished within any consultation seven days after September 4, 2010 earthquakes. Its reopening in the town centre represents some level of reparation and the promise of revitalisation.

Has the population shift to North Canterbury been important to the arts in the district?

“Of course it has. The new gallery would not have been possible without the September earthquake. Kaiapoi is a unique settlement. It is an historical town with a river and that continues to shape it as a place to meet. The prospect for the library, gallery and museum is also about interaction.”

Art Expo Revisited – Kaiapoi Art Expo celebrated its 10th birthday

Kaiapoi Art Expo celebrated its 10th birthday this month and a s a tribute to the popular annual art exhibition Art ON The Quay invited former guest artists and winners of Public Choice awards to take part in Art Expo Revisited. Artists are:Sandra Duncan, Ann Filshie, Wilson Henderson, Emma Johns, Mary Kelleher, Mark Lander, Christine Lang, Mark Larsen, Marilyn Rea Menzies, Karen Werner and creator of the familiar Prima Primadonna image used for branding the iconic Waimakariri art event, Rae West
The exhibition sees the return of the popular textile mural by Mary Kelleher of The Mill is Kaiapoi and Mark Landers has a triptych using his flowers made from waste paper.
A wreath by Mark, a smaller version of an art work he hopes will be displayed in Christchurch’s cardboard cathedral, is also in the show.
The exhibition runs from 17 July to 19th August.

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Artists Bios from Exhibition

Art@Work exhibition

Art@Work exhibition – 13 local Waimakariri artists are exhibiting some amazing artwork.

This is the first “Art on the Quay” exhibition where all artwork is for sale, “there is something for everyone’s taste” in this eclectic mix of clay sculptures from Rachel Harre and Frank Malone, acrylics from Sandra Duncan, steel sculptures from Mark Larsen, lively paintings from Joanne McDougall, mixed media from Diana Gillanders, Gorgeous gloss work from Christine Watton, pop art from Joel Hart, abstracts from Paul Smith, recycled glass from NakedArt, Gorgeous colours from Patrick Bonner, landscapes from Ruby Whitty, airbrush and ink from Martyn Giles and Carol Moffatt is showing some lovely water colours.

As we were setting up the exhibition we had bus loads of people eager to see the latest exhibition, and it is well worth a visit.

If you are keen on purchasing any of the artwork, all you have to do is approach one of the library staff and pay a small deposit of a $100, at the end of the exhibition the organizers will make contact with you to collect and pay the balance.

I would suggest if you are keen on any of the art work that you best get in fast

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

Rachel Harre and Frank Malone

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

 

 

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

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Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

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Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

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Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

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Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel

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Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel - all for sale

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel - all for sale

Art@Work exhibition - local Waimakariri artists, paintings, water colours, mixed media, amazing clay sculptures, glass, steel - all for sale

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Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Kaiapoi North, Kaiapoi Borough and St Patrick’s Primary Schools have contributed artworks of Anzac Day to be displayed alongside the work of Belgian art students.
The Battle of Passchendaele has been a byword for the horror of the Great War with 3700 New Zealand casualties, of which 45 officers and 800 men were either dead or lying mortally wounded between the lines.

In terms of lives lost in a single day, this remains the blackest day in New Zealand’s history.
In 2007, on the 90th anniversary of that battle, the Waimakariri District was invited to formally ‘twin’ with Zonnebeke-Passendale, reuniting the bonds forged between our two districts on the fields of Flanders.
Flanders is forever linked with soldiers’ blood, through the celebrated poem by John McCrae, which immortalised the sacrifice made by so many on the battlefield.
Waimakariri was chosen as a twin because of its similarity in landscape and people and in recognition of the number of soldiers from here who remain buried there.
A scrapbook of stories and memories of our soldiers was presented to the visiting Belgians and in return they gifted the artworks in this exhibition.
The prints are works by students of the RHoK Academie of Visual Arts in Brussels, three generations removed from the horror of that time.
The works are sombre, produced by a variety of printmaking processes.
Some are lithographs, others etchings and some are linoblock.
Mud was as much an enemy of the soldiers fighting in Flanders as the enemy.
The name conjures images of shell craters, barbed wire across a shattered landscape of mud, soldiers trapped in trenches to be mown down by machine gunfire or blown up by artillery.
The capture of the village of Passchendaele near Ypres in Flanders cost thousands of lives.
More New Zealand soldiers died in Belgium than any other country.
In the many war cemeteries that surround Passchendaele the graves are still cared for and respected and the people there do not forget those who sacrificed their lives for their freedom.
The exhibition runs until 28 May.

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Passchendaele 1917 Remembered

Faces behind the “Favourites” Exhibition

Thank you to the owners who were photographed with their artworks, which they kindly loaned to “Art on the Quay” for the Favourites exhibition:

We would love for people to post a comment below, letting us know which is your favourite.

Blackwells Brent and Shirley Dan Elevated image Fenwicks Ian McNish Joan Mark Maureen 1 Michael Speech Still life Sue Sutherlands Wide Angle 2